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  • admin 10:34 am on September 26, 2016 Permalink
    Tags: Information, ,   

    Information Management Symposium 

    IM Symposium is a trade show hosted by Blue Cross Blue Shield for information professionals.
    Teradata Events

     
  • admin 9:55 am on September 1, 2016 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Information, , , Wikipedia   

    What Enterprise Information Management Can Learn From Facebook And Wikipedia 

    Latest imported feed items on Analytics Matters

     
  • admin 9:51 am on August 9, 2016 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Information, ,   

    The Information Difference Data Warehouse Landscape Q4 2015 


    Teradata Analyst Reports

     
  • admin 9:47 am on September 19, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: , Information   

    Banking on Information 


    Teradata White Papers

     
  • admin 9:51 am on September 13, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: , , Defend, Information,   

    Defend Your Information Assets With Database Security 

    Q3-15_Applied Solutions_securityAs cyberattacks become increasingly commonplace, keeping data under strict control is moreimportant than ever.  That’s why any comprehensive security strategy must include database protection.

    The Teradata® Database provides a rich set of controls that ensures all sensitive data is fully protected and only authorized users can access it. These features allow organizations to implement and maintain a strong defense against data breaches to protect their most important asset—their data.

    Read more about the “must haves” of database security and how the Teradata Database can help protect your business.

    Brett Martin
    Editor-in-Chief
    Teradata Magazine

     

    The post Defend Your Information Assets With Database Security appeared first on Magazine Blog.

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  • admin 9:52 am on September 3, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: Aligned, , Information, ,   

    Is Your Information Structure Aligned with the Corporate Strategy? 

    So, your organisation just went through yet another restructure! You notice that the new structure does not look very different to the last one 6 months ago and again not vastly different to how it was 20+ years ago and likely to remain for the foreseeable future, with the exception of Heads that change!


    Source: England.nhs.uk

    By keeping the general organisation design this way the top level management can maintain span of control by establishing boundaries and rules of behaviour to ensure certainty that the organisation’s resources are efficiently managed to provide best return on investment. This sort of organisation structure, generally recognised as mechanistic or bureaucratic is commensurate with a view that strategy is formed at the top of the organisation and the rest of organisation is seen as a means of implementing the strategy. While generally not visible in the organisation chart, other forms of design co-exist (e.g. matrix structures) in most organisations, to enable new product development, geographic integration and cross-functional coordination.

    In this resource-driven paradigm, enterprise information is considered a corporate resource and is centrally managed. Corporate managers continually enhance and ‘ring-fence’ corporate data as part of the planning process with an expectation that it can be tapped at any time with the reliability, stability and certainty of achieving a predictable value from it. For top level managers and the customer-facing employees the enterprise information becomes mission critical and a proxy to the state of affairs of the organisation. So, the limits imposed on the organisation’s database are based upon the managers’ own perception of their value as information. In this context, relational databases, SQL, strict service levels for concurrent query workload management become the norm. From this perspective, hierarchical organisational structures, SQL and relational databases join the ranks of death and taxes.

    This is not to say that bureaucratic organisational structure is the only design or ideal or desirable design for a number of reasons: globalisation, mergers and acquisitions, horizontal / vertical integration, outsourcing, crowdsourcing, digital transformation etc. Henry Mintzberg, one of the most influential researchers in organisational strategy wrote the book in 1980, “Structures in Five: Designing Effective Organisations”.

    Mintzberg advises organisational strategists to change the precise configurations of their organisation regularly by adjusting the 5 essential components of the structure (i.e. Strategic Apex, Middle Line, Operating Core, Techno-structure, Support Staff) while maintaining the basic form (i.e. Functional hierarchy; Divisional hierarchy; Adhocracy; Network organisation etc) for ensuring control (see example pictures below). Most notable of these is Adhocracy, which has very little formal structure for companies facing complex and dynamic environment with highly skilled professional specialists in their organisation who work together through a process of mutual adjustment.


    Source: lindsay-sherwin.co.uk

    Among companies that have leveraged such informal structures is 3M Corporation, which regularly formed a small number of teams to try out new ideas; some die out fairly quickly, but others develop into new growth opportunity that spins off as new ventures or even separate divisions. A notable example is the Post-It Note that was developed out of the bootlegging program.

    Why should enterprise information architecture and structure, on which the executives, managers and employees who rely on for running their business be any different? Is the enterprise information structure adapting to dynamic changes? Why not use Discovery Analytics that minimises risks to derive greater value to the enterprise?

    Much as how organisation strategy and organisational structures have evolved over time, digital (i.e. Online, social network, social media ,etc) is transforming the information landscape of the enterprise into loosely coupled and non-coupled data structures that co-exist with tightly coupled structures (see diagram below) to enable enhanced intelligence from advanced analytics. In fact, machine learning is becoming a big driver because of its implications for the service industry wherein many traditional services type activities can be done by computers more quickly, more cost effectively and more accurately.

    In this digital age, Teradata’s Unified Data Architecture allows the flexibility for organisations to adapt to the changing attitudes and behaviours of customers by seamlessly integrating all types and structures of data to enable strategic and operational intelligence.

    Hence, on the one hand, the extent of information at the core is limited by the boundaries drawn up by the managers, and on the other hand, expanded by the variety of enterprise data accessible by the customer-facing employees. So, modern enterprise information is the consequence of a complex mix of structured and semi-structured data that transform perceived information into actionable decisions by using the skills of employees for the benefit of improved communication and organisational performance. Is your Information Architecture aligned with the corporate strategy? Do you have business governance in place to ensure Discovery Analytics is in the corporate agenda?

    Sundara Raman is a Senior Communications Industry Consultant at Teradata. He has 30 years of experience in the telecommunications industry that spans fixed line, mobile, broadband and Pay TV sectors. He specialises in Business Value Consulting, business intelligence, Big Data and Customer Experience Management solutions for communication service providers. Connect with Sundara on Linkedin.

    The post Is Your Information Structure Aligned with the Corporate Strategy? appeared first on International Blog.

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  • admin 9:51 am on July 20, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: Information, , ,   

    Unifying Information Management – Why it Matters 

    I have just been reading the results of the recent Teradata Data Analysis Index survey that was released of 152 senior IT executives from large Australia corporates. It further confirms that data has become an indispensable asset for most businesses with 88% of respondents using one or more analytic tools to manage and use their data.

    Not surprising that the major obstacles continue to be the proliferation of silos of data sets, the lack of ability to show ROI and the buy-in/funding from executive management.

    Today’s data environment is getting more and more complex. We have evangelists for big data, discovery platforms, agile labs and cloud services achieving great success in providing capability for quick insights, realisation to value and fail fast discovery processes. However, these are often delivered as point solutions that result in further data silos. This adds even more complexity to the data environment/landscape.

     

    Teradata Data Analysis Index

    While the agile business driven discovery process ensures buy-in from business management, scaling and moving successful discovery/insights solutions to a reliable production environment remains a challenge for many.

    This brings me to my favorite, albeit sometimes boring, subject – UNIFIED INFORMATION MANAGEMENT GOVERNANCE (IMG). This is about supporting the requirements of the business in using data for analytics – covering ALL DATA regardless of source, structure and location! So this includes creation, capture, deployment and access to data. This is the main domain for Chief Data Officers to ensure that business and IT planning processes are aligned and deliver a clear understanding of the consequences of data driven and analytical projects.

    At Teradata, we adopt a Unified Data Architecture (UDA) view of this emerging data environment. Big data, discovery platforms, cloud, data marts and integrated data warehouses are part of an ecosystem that is about managing the different needs of data usage. Delivering the means of ensuring that the parts are in sync and platforms optimally used for the business purpose falls on a unified information management governance approach is the key.

     

    Unified Data Architecture

    Now this is a politically sensitive topic and often is poison to the “point solution” or ‘fast and furious” enthusiasts. But as we have observed in organisations that have successfully managed these multi-platform solutions across big data, integrated data warehouse and in combination with cloud services, adopting a unified data governance framework is essential.

    In its most basic form, every new initiative needs to be assessed as to its data asset impact. When a new project is initiated to do data discovery work to identify new business opportunities most organisation have a clear understanding of the impact of the project during the discovery period (eg what parts of the ecosystem it will be using including cloud components).

    What needs to be added is what will be the total impactwhen SUCCESSFUL! There are two parts to this assessment:

    • the probability of success and
    • the ecosystem requirements to productionise and then scale the solution.

    The probability of success can be quickly assessed by whether the application or analytics being tried is new ground-breaking possibilities or something already proven and successfully implemented elsewhere (another country/company/industry). The later would have a higher probability of success and therefore requires more serious consideration of how to productionise and scale-up the solution before the success.

    For example, people wanting to experiment on running an application on a new technology (Hadoop) instead of doing it in a traditional DW environment would need to consider the ecosystem impact (eg what data sources and data flows need to be modified and productionised) (audit, lineage and security considerations, backup, privacy, flexibility, etc), and if and how data will be accessed and shared.

    This Unified Information Management Governance view has significant implications:

    • Agile discovery solutions need to be part of the menu of available analytical solutions (Discovery platforms, agile data labs, cloud). It is no longer practical to offer data warehouse (integrated or not) as the only information management solution for analytics.
    • The information management governance for discovery solutions need to be done together with the traditional data warehouses governance.   This will facilitate an enterprise assessment of a project’s impact to the company’s total data assets.
    • The need to build and maintain a central repository covering all meta data across the different environments.
    • Having a clear view of the data impact of a project will help in managing expectation across the business and IT stakeholders.

    Renato Manongdo is a Senior Financial Services Industry Consultant at Teradata ANZ and is also the practice lead for Business Value Assessment in Asia Pacific. Connect with Renato Manongdo on Linkedin.

    The post Unifying Information Management – Why it Matters appeared first on International Blog.

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  • admin 9:51 am on July 15, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: Considerations, , Information, ,   

    Considerations for a Unified Information Management Governance 

    I have just been reading the results of the recent Teradata Data Analysis Index survey that was released of 152 senior IT executives from large Australia corporates. It further confirms that data has become an indispensable asset for most businesses with 88% of respondents using one or more analytic tools to manage and use their data.

    Not surprising that the major obstacles continue to be the proliferation of silos of data sets, the lack of ability to show ROI and the buy-in/funding from executive management.

    Today’s data environment is getting more and more complex. We have evangelists for big data, discovery platforms, agile labs and cloud services achieving great success in providing capability for quick insights, realisation to value and fail fast discovery processes. However, these are often delivered as point solutions that result in further data silos. This adds even more complexity to the data environment/landscape.

     

    Teradata Data Analysis Index

    While the agile business driven discovery process ensures buy-in from business management, scaling and moving successful discovery/insights solutions to a reliable production environment remains a challenge for many.

    This brings me to my favorite, albeit sometimes boring, subject – UNIFIED INFORMATION MANAGEMENT GOVERNANCE (IMG). This is about supporting the requirements of the business in using data for analytics – covering ALL DATA regardless of source, structure and location! So this includes creation, capture, deployment and access to data. This is the main domain for Chief Data Officers to ensure that business and IT planning processes are aligned and deliver a clear understanding of the consequences of data driven and analytical projects.

    At Teradata, we adopt a Unified Data Architecture (UDA) view of this emerging data environment. Big data, discovery platforms, cloud, data marts and integrated data warehouses are part of an ecosystem that is about managing the different needs of data usage. Delivering the means of ensuring that the parts are in sync and platforms optimally used for the business purpose falls on a unified information management governance approach is the key.

     

    Unified Data Architecture

    Now this is a politically sensitive topic and often is poison to the “point solution” or ‘fast and furious” enthusiasts. But as we have observed in organisations that have successfully managed these multi-platform solutions across big data, integrated data warehouse and in combination with cloud services, adopting a unified data governance framework is essential.

    In its most basic form, every new initiative needs to be assessed as to its data asset impact. When a new project is initiated to do data discovery work to identify new business opportunities most organisation have a clear understanding of the impact of the project during the discovery period (eg what parts of the ecosystem it will be using including cloud components).

    What needs to be added is what will be the total impactwhen SUCCESSFUL! There are two parts to this assessment:

    • the probability of success and
    • the ecosystem requirements to productionise and then scale the solution.

    The probability of success can be quickly assessed by whether the application or analytics being tried is new ground-breaking possibilities or something already proven and successfully implemented elsewhere (another country/company/industry). The later would have a higher probability of success and therefore requires more serious consideration of how to productionise and scale-up the solution before the success.

    For example, people wanting to experiment on running an application on a new technology (Hadoop) instead of doing it in a traditional DW environment would need to consider the ecosystem impact (eg what data sources and data flows need to be modified and productionised) (audit, lineage and security considerations, backup, privacy, flexibility, etc), and if and how data will be accessed and shared.

    This Unified Information Management Governance view has significant implications:

    • Agile discovery solutions need to be part of the menu of available analytical solutions (Discovery platforms, agile data labs, cloud). It is no longer practical to offer data warehouse (integrated or not) as the only information management solution for analytics.
    • The information management governance for discovery solutions need to be done together with the traditional data warehouses governance.   This will facilitate an enterprise assessment of a project’s impact to the company’s total data assets.
    • The need to build and maintain a central repository covering all meta data across the different environments.
    • Having a clear view of the data impact of a project will help in managing expectation across the business and IT stakeholders.

    Renato Manongdo is a Senior Financial Services Industry Consultant at Teradata ANZ and is also the practice lead for Business Value Assessment in Asia Pacific. Connect with Renato Manongdo on Linkedin.

    The post Considerations for a Unified Information Management Governance appeared first on International Blog.

    Teradata Blogs Feed

     
  • admin 10:33 am on May 20, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: , Builders, Information,   

    Information Builders Summit 2015 

    Teradata will be present at the Information Builders Summit 2015 at the Gaylord Palms in Kissimmee, Florida. Please visit our booth in the Solutions Pavilion to find out more about Teradata and Information Builders. Also, attend our education session on “The Role of BI in Big Data” presented by John Thuma on Sunday, May 31 at 3:15 PM.
    Teradata Events

     
  • admin 9:50 am on March 12, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: , Information, institution, Leaner, , , transformed   

    Leaner and smarter how the information revolution transformed a financial institution 


    Teradata Case Studies

     
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